José Guadalupe Posada – La Catrina’s Journey to the Day of The Dead

José Guadalupe Posada – La Catrina’s Journey to the Day of The Dead

José Guadalupe Posada was born in Aguascalientes; his illustrations and political commentary using skulls and skeletons eventually became associated to the Day of the Dead, and his "calavera garbancera" entered the folklore of the festivities with the name coined by Diego Rivera: "La Catrina" ... click on title for more 

Being Thankful

Being Thankful

One of my daughters is currently working from the Canadian province of Nova Scotia, which was subjected to the fury of Hurricane Fiona.  My husband and I had planned a trip to visit her this fall, and had already bought our plane tickets to Halifax (capital city) for the Monday right after the storm; because both my husband and my daughter had also booked their time off from work, we decided that, if the airport was open, we were going, even just to give our daughter some moral support in the aftermath. Once there, I realized there were other ways to help, and many reasons to be grateful ... click on title for more

National Taco Day 2022

National Taco Day 2022

In the USA, and recently here in Canada, National Taco Day is marked on the calendar on October 4; that is the date I have adopted, which has become an integral part in my blog, to take the opportunity to make a list of my posts with a taco theme during the year.   This year, I have another delicious selection of tacos ... click on title for more

My Dad’s Pictures: Mexico City Metropolitan Cathedral

My Dad’s Pictures: Mexico City Metropolitan Cathedral

For this Father's Day, I am remembering my dad today through two of his pictures (circa 1970):  A night view of Mexico City's Metropolitan Cathedral (above), and a similar frame during the day (below), with a view of the tabernacle on the right side, and my brother and me walking towards the building.   To all [...]

Cortadillo de Res – Northern Style Beef Stew

Cortadillo de Res – Northern Style Beef Stew

Juneteenth is the oldest known celebration commemorating the ending of slavery in the United States. The Mascogos, a group of Afro-Mexicans, small, yet historically very relevant, living in the Northern Mexican state of Coahuila, have been celebrating Juneteenth  for generations, with a fusion of African, Mexican and Seminole (indigenous groups from Florida) traditions, such as dancing to música norteña (Northern Mexico music), singing hymnals to hand-clapped rhythms called capeyuye,  and sharing a meal that often includes cortadillo, a dish of beef or goat meat, cooked in a chunky tomato sauce ... click on title for more