Pan de Yema – A Day of the Dead Bread from Oaxaca

Pan de Yema – A Day of the Dead Bread from Oaxaca

All wheat-based bread in Mexico has a clear Spanish or French influence, and this particular one can be traced to Spanish recipes, but some families have been baking this bread in the Mexican state of Oaxaca for several generations. Pan de yema translates as “yolk bread”, an apt name since a batch contains several eggs and a few extra yolks, giving them their characteristic flaky texture and slightly yellow tone … click on title for more

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Pan de Muerto – Day of the Dead Bread

Pan de Muerto – Day of the Dead Bread

Pan de muerto (literally, bread of the dead) is a sweet bread that is almost always included in Day of the Dead offerings, and traditionally eaten on November 2nd. It is fashioned in a round shape which may represent the natural and endless cycle of life and death, and decorated with small pieces of the same dough to symbolize bones and tears … Click on image for more

Huauzontle Patties – Tortitas de huauzontle

Huauzontle Patties – Tortitas de huauzontle

The technique used for these patties is known as capeado, which means “coated” or “under a layer.” The accustomed way to serve them is drenched in a sauce; the most popular is red mole, but caldillo (made with tomatoes) and my choice of cooked green sauce (made with tomatillos) are also very tasy … click on title for more

Custard with Caramel – Flan

Custard with Caramel – Flan

This dessert came to Mexico from Spain during colonial times, with the introduction of dairy products from farm animals such as cows and goats, all new to the land. In Mexico, flan is always crust-less; ubiquitous on restaurant menus, whether high-end or family businesses, it has remained popular since colonial times ... click on title for more