Hidalgo Style Tlacoyos

Hidalgo Style Tlacoyos

This recipe is an example of true fusion between Spanish and native Mexican, ancient cuisines; the native corn dough and tomatillo sauce have been enhanced with the addition of lard, cilantro and garlic, and the filling is mashed green peas, a legume imported from Europe.  Lard is also used to crisp the tlacoyos, a step that is not the norm for tlacoyos in other regions.   ... click on title for more

Mexican Markets – Pre- and Post-Hispanic Marvels

Mexican Markets – Pre- and Post-Hispanic Marvels

There is no doubt that markets have always been a central part of Mexican society. In pre-Hispanic times, there were small local ones, as well as the large central market of Tlatelolco, with items from all around Mesoamerica. After the Spanish conquest was completed, a long period of adjustment and exchange began, and post-Hispanic markets became a fusion between the Old and the New World ... click on title for more

Black History Month – Afro-Mexicans

Black History Month – Afro-Mexicans

From the onset of European explorations in the Caribbean islands and Mexican soil in the late 15th century, some African nationals or their descendants in the Iberian peninsula, participated not only as slaves, but also as auxiliaries to Spanish and Portuguese explorers, or as part of the crew.  Once the conquest campaigns begun in the early 16th Century, there is documented evidence of black conquistadores of African descent, such as Juan Garrido ... click on title for more

Wafer Chocolate Bars – Tin Larín Style

Wafer Chocolate Bars – Tin Larín Style

Chocolate bars with one or more wafer/biscuit layers are very popular all around the World. Tin Larín is a Mexican wafer sandwich with peanut-flavoured filling and covered with milk chocolate; when I realized it now tasted artificial and too sugary, with hardly a trace of peanut flavour, I decided to make my own at home ... click on title for more

Coffee in Mexico and “Café con leche”

Coffee in Mexico and “Café con leche”

In the 1720s, it was a French officer who introduced coffee to the American continent, when he brought a plant with him to the Caribbean island of Martinique.  After a successful harvest in 1726, other plants were brought to Antilles, Jamaica and Cuba.  In the 1790s, the first coffee plants finally made it to the Mexican port of Veracruz in the Golf of Mexico, from the Caribbean islands.  Other coffee plantations were established in later years: in the South, in Chiapas, with coffee plants from Guatemala, and Oaxaca with coffee from Cuba; and near the Pacific coast, in Michoacán and neighbouring states, with beans brought directly from the port of Mokha, in Yemen.  In the early 1800s, towards the end of the Spanish rule in Mexico, the first cafés opened in Mexico City, and coffee was served, “ … estilo de Francia": esto es, endulzado y con leche.” - “… the French way, that is, sweetened and with milk” ... click on title for more