Mexican Sorbet – Nieve de Garrafa

Mexican Sorbet – Nieve de Garrafa

Nieve means snow, and garrafa is the Spanish word for a tall container, used primarily to hold liquids, but in this context, it is the name given to the metal tubs where a sorbet base (liquid) is first poured; this garrafa snuggly sits in a wooden barrel with salty ice to freeze the liquid … click on title for more

A Saturday in Guadalajara

A Saturday in Guadalajara

The rich and intricated history of Guadalajara explains why there are too many Art centres and museums, markets, monuments and interesting churches and landmarks to visit in a single day. However, I had the chance to see some highlights, guided by my niece and her husband, along with my sister and brother in-law … click on title for more

Street Food – Esquites

Street Food – Esquites

Two very popular street foods in Mexico are corn on the cob and esquites (from the Nahuatl form izquitl - roasted young corn.) In pre-Hispanic times, esquite was probably eaten with dry hot peppers and salt and, after the Spanish conquest, lime juice was added to the seasonings. Nowadays, it is very common to top esquites with mayonnaise, shredded cheese and a variety of spicy ingredients … click on title for more

The Flying Clay Pot from Jalisco

The Flying Clay Pot from Jalisco

"La cazuela voladora" (The Flying Clay Pot) is a bubbly preparation in which tequila and a variety of citrus flavours conflate, popular in all of the Mexican state of Jalisco. During my visit to the town of San Pedro Tlaquepaque, I saw a giant version of it at one of the local restaurants, and I decided to give it a try back home in Canada, in a more manageable size … click on title for more