Traditional Sweets – Cocadas de Yema

Traditional Sweets – Cocadas de Yema

Colima is the capital city of the Mexican state with the same name; it is also known as "The City of the Palm Trees", which grow all around the state.  Not surprisingly,  coconut is one of the state's main crops, and in addition to coconut water, milk, oil, soap, and fibre for agricultural and industrial uses, the white flesh is enjoyed as nourishment, and as the main ingredient of delightful treats ... click on title for more

Layered Bean Tamales – A Traditional End-of-the-Harvest Feast

Layered Bean Tamales – A Traditional End-of-the-Harvest Feast

The bean tamales pictured at the top of the post, put together as layered rolls, and steamed, wrapped in corn husks, are a traditional foodstuff to share at the end of the corn harvest in several farming regions of Central and Southern Mexico, from Tonatico and Tlahuac, to the state of Oaxaca ... click on title for more

Amaranth Paste – A Healthy Treat for the Day of the Dead

Amaranth Paste –  A Healthy Treat for the Day of the Dead

El Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) is celebrated in Mexico on November 2, and amaranth was an important element in offerings for this occasion in pre-Hispanic times. Not long after the Spanish conquest, the Catholic church sent priests and missionaries to the new lands, taking the colonies by storm; they replaced the native rituals for the dead with great success, and the native amaranth was replaced with European wheat, both as a crop and for religious applications, such as for the now traditional Bread of the Dead (Pan de muerto).  Nowadays, amaranth seed has become very popular worldwide, as a healthy cereal substitute; as a way to observe the Day of the Dead, I made a batch of cooked amaranth paste, and formed it into skulls ... click on title for more