Traditional Sweets – Cocadas de Yema

Traditional Sweets – Cocadas de Yema

Colima is the capital city of the Mexican state with the same name; it is also known as "The City of the Palm Trees", which grow all around the state.  Not surprisingly,  coconut is one of the state's main crops, and in addition to coconut water, milk, oil, soap, and fibre for agricultural and industrial uses, the white flesh is enjoyed as nourishment, and as the main ingredient of delightful treats ... click on title for more

Layered Bean Tamales – A Traditional End-of-the-Harvest Feast

Layered Bean Tamales – A Traditional End-of-the-Harvest Feast

The bean tamales pictured at the top of the post, put together as layered rolls, and steamed, wrapped in corn husks, are a traditional foodstuff to share at the end of the corn harvest in several farming regions of Central and Southern Mexico, from Tonatico and Tlahuac, to the state of Oaxaca ... click on title for more

Traditional Sweets – Alegrías and Wafers with Amaranth

Traditional Sweets – Alegrías and Wafers with Amaranth

Popping seeds is a traditional way to cook amaranth in Mexico, where it is easy to find, as well as many sweets prepared with it. In other countries, raw amaranth seed has become readily available for its health benefits, and once popped at home, it may be used to prepare those traditional Mexican sweets, such as the all-time favourite alegrías - "joys", or wafer sandwiches ... click on title for more

Huevos motuleños  – Weekend Brunch at Home

Huevos motuleños  – Weekend Brunch at Home

As a follow up to my previous two posts, featuring Yucatan Style Longaniza and Cochinita Pibil, this is one more recipe from the Mexican state of Yucatan: Huevos Motuleños.  Huevos means eggs, and Motuleños means "from Motul", a small city and a municipality in the Mexican state of Yucatan ... click on title for more